Health Conditions our Dietitians can help you with:


Anaemia

WHAT IS ANAEMIA?

Anaemia is a deficiency in the amount and size of red blood cells in the body. This results in a lack of circulating oxygen in the blood. The most common type of anaemia is iron deficiency anaemia. Common symptoms include fatigue, weakness, headaches, pale skin, and inability to regulate body temperature.

Iron deficiency anaemia is commonly found in menstruating women, individuals who have gastrointestinal disease (such as coeliac disease, Cronhn’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticular disease), vegetarians or vegans, and athletes.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to improve your iron stores. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Iron Deficiency Anaemia – Melbourne Haematology

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (n.p.). Anaemia. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from http://daa.asn.au/for-the-public/smart-eating-for-you/nutrition-a-z/anaemia/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.
PEN. (2016). Hematology/Haematology - Anemia/Anaemia: Iron Deficiency. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=403&trid=22667&trcatid=38


Bariatric Surgery (Obesity Surgery)

WHAT IS BARIATRIC SURGERY?

Bariatric surgery is an approach to weight loss in clinically diagnosed severe obesity. The procedure involves surgically limiting food intake by reducing the capacity of the stomach. Several forms of bariatric surgery include gastric bypass, gastroplasty, and gastric banding.

Positive outcomes post surgery include weight loss, and improvement in diabetes, blood cholesterol and blood pressure.

Eligibility for bariatric surgery is determined by your healthcare professional team.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed pre and post bariatric surgery. Diet requirements vary at each stage of the surgery process, therefore a multi-phase approach to diet progression will be undertaken. An individualised plan will be developed throughout the surgery process, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Bariatric (Obesity Surgery) Nutrition - Obesity Surgery Society of Australia & New Zealand

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.
PEN. (2014). Healthy Weight/Obesity - Bariatric Surgery. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=15324&tkid=19916


Coeliac Disease

WHAT IS COELIAC DISEASE?

Coeliac disease is an autoimmune disease, caused by an immune reaction to gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, triticale and oats. This causes inflammation and damage to the small intestines, and also affects food absorption. Common symptoms include weight loss, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, anaemia, flactulence (passing wind), and weakness and fatigue.

An accurate medical diagnosis of coeliac disease is determined by a Gastroenterologist by performing a gastroscopy with a small bowel biopsy.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help eliminate gluten in your diet. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Coeliac NSW & ACT

REFERENCES

Dietitians Association of Australia. (n.p.). Coeliac Disease. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from http://daa.asn.au/for-the-public/smart-eating-for-you/nutrition-a-z/coeliac-disease/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.
PEN. (2013). Celiac/Coeliac Disease. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from https://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=924


Diabetes: Pre-Diabetes
(Impaired Glucose Tolerance – IGT & Impaired Fasting Glucose - IFG)

WHAT IS PRE-DIABETES?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when the blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not diagnosed as diabetes. There are two main types of pre-diabetes, Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) and Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG).

Some risk factors for developing pre-diabetes include being overweight, smoking, inactive lifestyle, and family history. If not treated or diagnosed correctly there is an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and heart disease (cardiovascular disease).

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed by taking a blood test, looking specifically at your blood glucose levels.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to reduce your risk or prevent the development of Type 2 diabetes by loosing weight and making improvements to your lifestyle. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Diabetes NSW & ACT
National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diabetes: Insulin Resistance

WHAT IS INSULIN RESISTANCE?

Insulin resistance occurs when the body’s cells (muscles and liver) do not respond properly to the hormone insulin. As a result, the body requires to make more glucose to keep the blood glucose levels normal, and overtime the pancreas is overworked due to the high demand of glucose required.

Some risk factors for developing insulin resistance include being overweight, family history of diabetes, inactive lifestyle, women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), and certain ethnic groups (such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders). If not treated or diagnosed correctly pre-diabetes may be developed, and there is an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and heart disease (cardiovascular disease).

Insulin resistance is diagnosed by taking a blood test, looking specifically at your fasting insulin level, or an Oral Glucose-Tolerance Test (OGTT).

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to reduce your risk or prevent the development of Type 2 diabetes by loosing weight and making improvements to your lifestyle. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Diabetes NSW & ACT
National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (n.p.). Insulin Resistance. Retrieved 12 December, 2016, from http://daa.asn.au/for-the-public/smart-eating-for-you/nutrition-a-z/insulin-resistance/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes

WHAT IS TYPE 1 DIABETES?

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, caused by the immune system attacking the pancreas and destroying the insulin making cells. As a result, the body cannot use the glucose as energy, which significantly increases the blood glucose levels in the body.

Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but commonly occurs in childhood and adolescence. Some common symptoms include excessive thirst, dehydration, weight loss, passing more urine, blurred vision, and fatigue. There is no known cause or cure for Type 1 diabetes. However, if not diagnosed properly or poorly managed complications can occur.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your Type 1 diabetes. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood glucose levels, diet history, and insulin medications. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Type 1 Diabetes – Diabetes Australia
Type 1 - National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) 

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diabetes: Type 2 Diabetes

WHAT IS TYPE 2 DIABETES?

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin and/or the body’s cells (muscles and liver) do not respond properly to the hormone insulin (insulin resistance). As a result, there is a significant increase in blood glucose levels in the body.

Some risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes include being overweight, family history of diabetes, inactive lifestyle, age, women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), and certain ethnic groups (such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders). Symptoms may not be noticed, but common symptoms include excessive thirst, passing more urine, blurred vision, headaches, and always feeling hungry. Type 2 diabetes should be managed properly to reduce any complications from occurring.

Type 2 Diabetes is diagnosed by taking a blood glucose test, an Oral Glucose-Tolerance Test (OGTT), or a haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) test.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your Type 2 diabetes. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood glucose levels, diet history, and any diabetic medications. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Type 2 Diabetes – Diabetes Australia
Type 2 – National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diabetes: Gestational Diabetes

WHAT IS Gestational DIABETES?

During pregnancy, some women may be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs when the body does not respond properly to the hormone insulin (insulin resistance). This is due to hormones made by the placenta for the growth and development of the baby affecting the blood glucose levels in the body.

Women who are at a higher risk of developing gestational diabetes include being overweight, age of 30 years or above, family history of type 2 diabetes, previous history of gestational diabetes, and certain ethnic groups (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, Indian, Chinese, Vietnamese, Middle Eastern, and Polynesian).

Symptoms may not be noticed, but common symptoms include excessive thirst, passing more urine, tiredness, and thrush. Gestational diabetes should be managed properly to reduce any complications from occurring during and after pregnancy for you and your baby.

Gestational Diabetes is diagnosed by taking a Pregnancy Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (POGTT).

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your gestational diabetes, manage your pregnancy weight gain, and promote proper growth and development for your baby. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood glucose levels, diet history, weight, and any diabetic medications. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Gestational Diabetes – Diabetes Australia
Gestational Diabetes – National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diverticular Disease (Diverticulosis & Diverticulitis)

WHAT IS DIVERTICULAR DISEASE?

Diverticular disease or diverticulosis occurs when small pockets appear on the sides of the large intestines (usually the colon). The small pockets are known as diverticula, and when they become inflamed or infected the condition is known as diverticulitis. 

Diverticular disease is most commonly found in older adults. There are generally no symptoms for diverticular disease, however symptoms are experienced with diverticulitis. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, constipation and/or diarrhoea, vomiting, fever, bloody stool, and bloating.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your diverticular disease. Diet requirements vary when you experience diverticulitis symptoms or not, therefore a multi-phase approach to diet progression will be undertaken. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Diverticular Disease – Bowel Cancer Australia

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (n.p.). Diverticulitis. Retrieved 15 December, 2016, from http://daa.asn.au/for-the-public/smart-eating-for-you/nutrition-a-z/diverticulitis/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Food Allergy

WHAT ARE FOOD ALLERGIES?

A food allergy occurs when the immune system has an adverse reaction to a protein in specific foods. The most common food allergies include eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, soy, milk, wheat, fish, and shellfish.

Allergic reactions to a food usually occur immediately and symptoms can range from mild to severe. Mild to moderate symptoms include swelling of the face, lips and/or eyes, hives and rashes, abdominal pain, and vomiting. Severe allergic reactions are called anaphylaxis and can be life threatening. Signs of anaphylaxis include difficulty breathing, swelling of the tongue and throat, persistent dizziness, irritated and red eyes, and loss of consciousness.

A food allergy is diagnosed by taking skin prick allergy tests or allergy blood tests.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help eliminate the specific food that is causing an allergic reaction in your diet. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia
Food Allergy – Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology & Allergy

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). What’s the difference between food allergy and food intolerance?. Retrieved 17 January, 2017, from What’s the difference between food allergy and food intolerance?
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Food Intolerance

WHAT ARE FOOD INTOLERANCES?

A food intolerance is a chemical reaction that occurs when a person has a reaction to chemicals that are found naturally in foods or by chemicals that are added to foods, and does not involve the immune system. Common natural chemicals that may cause a reaction include salicylates (found in a wide variety of herbs, spices, fruit and vegetables), amines (found in pineapple, bananas, vegetables, red wine, chocolate, citrus fruits, and mature cheeses), and glutamates (found in tomatoes, soy sauce, mushroom, and some cheeses). Common food additives that may cause a reaction include preservatives, artificial colours, and flavour enhancers such as monosodium glutamate (MSG).

Food intolerance reactions usually occur depending on the amount of food the person has eaten. A reaction occurs depending on the amount of chemicals in the person’s body, also known as the dose threshold. Therefore, different people may tolerate different amounts of the chemicals in their body. Common symptoms include headaches and migraines, diarrhoea, sweating, rashes, and breathing problems.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help identify the specific food/s in your diet that are causing an intolerance and help minimise symptoms. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Food Intolerance – Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology & Allergy

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). Understanding food intolerance & sensitivity. Retrieved 17 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/medical/understanding-food-intolerance-sensitivity/
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). What’s the difference between food allergy and food intolerance?. Retrieved 17 January, 2017, from What’s the difference between food allergy and food intolerance?
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


General Healthy Eating

Healthy eating is about what is best for your body, overall general health and wellbeing. Each person is an individual and will have different food requirements. It is about balance, moderation, variety, adequacy, and knowing what food is right for your body. Eating healthy will help reduce your risk or prevent nutritional issues such as heart disease, overweight and obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and Type 2 diabetes.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to improve your overall health. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Australian Guide to Healthy Eating

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


Gout

WHAT IS GOUT?

Gout is a common type of inflammatory arthritis. It occurs when there is a build up of uric acid in the blood, which causes crystals to form in the joints. This causes the joints to inflame, and the joint can become swollen, red, and very tender.

Gout is most commonly found in men, other risk factors include overweight and obesity, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, not drinking enough water, and a high alcohol consumption. The most common affected joint is in the big toe, but other areas that are affected by gout include feet, ankles, elbow, and knees. Common symptoms include sudden pain, swelling of the joint, warmth and tenderness. Also the skin around the joint will be tight, red, and shiny.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help manage and prevent gout attacks, identify specific foods in your diet that are causing an increase in uric acid in the blood, help minimise symptoms and reduce pain. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Gout – Arthritis Foundation

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). Helping to ease the pain of gout through diet. Retrieved 17 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/medical/helping-to-ease-the-pain-of-gout-through-diet/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2016). Gout: Background. Retrieved 18 January, 2017, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=1956&trid=19772&trcatid=38
PEN. (2016). Gout: Practice Guidance Toolkit. Retrieved 18 January, 2017, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=1956&tkid=20327


Heart Disease
(Coronary Heart Disease – CHD & Cardiovascular Disease - CVD)

WHAT IS HEART DISEASE?

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the general term used to describe all the diseases in relation to the heart and blood vessels. Heart disease or coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common form of cardiovascular disease. Heart disease occurs when the blood supplied to the heart is partially or completely blocked. This is caused by a build up of cholesterol and plaque in the walls of the arteries. If the arteries become completely blocked, a heart attack can occur.

Some risk factors for developing heart disease include increasing age, male gender, family history of heart disease, being overweight or obese, diabetes, smoking, inactive lifestyle, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help manage and reduce your risk of heart disease. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.