Health Conditions our Dietitians can help you with:


Anaemia

WHAT IS ANAEMIA?

Anaemia is a deficiency in the amount and size of red blood cells in the body. This results in a lack of circulating oxygen in the blood. The most common type of anaemia is iron deficiency anaemia. Common symptoms include fatigue, weakness, headaches, pale skin, and inability to regulate body temperature.

Iron deficiency anaemia is commonly found in menstruating women, individuals who have gastrointestinal disease (such as coeliac disease, Cronhn’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticular disease), vegetarians or vegans, and athletes.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to improve your iron stores. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Iron Deficiency Anaemia – Melbourne Haematology

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (n.p.). Anaemia. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from http://daa.asn.au/for-the-public/smart-eating-for-you/nutrition-a-z/anaemia/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.
PEN. (2016). Hematology/Haematology - Anemia/Anaemia: Iron Deficiency. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=403&trid=22667&trcatid=38


Bariatric Surgery (Obesity Surgery)

WHAT IS BARIATRIC SURGERY?

Bariatric surgery is an approach to weight loss in clinically diagnosed severe obesity. The procedure involves surgically limiting food intake by reducing the capacity of the stomach. Several forms of bariatric surgery include gastric bypass, gastroplasty, and gastric banding.

Positive outcomes post surgery include weight loss, and improvement in diabetes, blood cholesterol and blood pressure.

Eligibility for bariatric surgery is determined by your healthcare professional team.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed pre and post bariatric surgery. Diet requirements vary at each stage of the surgery process, therefore a multi-phase approach to diet progression will be undertaken. An individualised plan will be developed throughout the surgery process, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Bariatric (Obesity Surgery) Nutrition - Obesity Surgery Society of Australia & New Zealand

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.
PEN. (2014). Healthy Weight/Obesity - Bariatric Surgery. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=15324&tkid=19916


Coeliac Disease

WHAT IS COELIAC DISEASE?

Coeliac disease is an autoimmune disease, caused by an immune reaction to gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, triticale and oats. This causes inflammation and damage to the small intestines, and also affects food absorption. Common symptoms include weight loss, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, anaemia, flactulence (passing wind), and weakness and fatigue.

An accurate medical diagnosis of coeliac disease is determined by a Gastroenterologist by performing a gastroscopy with a small bowel biopsy.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help eliminate gluten in your diet. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Coeliac NSW & ACT

REFERENCES

Dietitians Association of Australia. (n.p.). Coeliac Disease. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from http://daa.asn.au/for-the-public/smart-eating-for-you/nutrition-a-z/coeliac-disease/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.
PEN. (2013). Celiac/Coeliac Disease. Retrieved 29 November, 2016, from https://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=924


Diabetes: Pre-Diabetes
(Impaired Glucose Tolerance – IGT & Impaired Fasting Glucose - IFG)

WHAT IS PRE-DIABETES?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when the blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not diagnosed as diabetes. There are two main types of pre-diabetes, Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) and Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG).

Some risk factors for developing pre-diabetes include being overweight, smoking, inactive lifestyle, and family history. If not treated or diagnosed correctly there is an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and heart disease (cardiovascular disease).

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed by taking a blood test, looking specifically at your blood glucose levels.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to reduce your risk or prevent the development of Type 2 diabetes by loosing weight and making improvements to your lifestyle. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Diabetes NSW & ACT
National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diabetes: Insulin Resistance

WHAT IS INSULIN RESISTANCE?

Insulin resistance occurs when the body’s cells (muscles and liver) do not respond properly to the hormone insulin. As a result, the body requires to make more glucose to keep the blood glucose levels normal, and overtime the pancreas is overworked due to the high demand of glucose required.

Some risk factors for developing insulin resistance include being overweight, family history of diabetes, inactive lifestyle, women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), and certain ethnic groups (such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders). If not treated or diagnosed correctly pre-diabetes may be developed, and there is an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and heart disease (cardiovascular disease).

Insulin resistance is diagnosed by taking a blood test, looking specifically at your fasting insulin level, or an Oral Glucose-Tolerance Test (OGTT).

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to reduce your risk or prevent the development of Type 2 diabetes by loosing weight and making improvements to your lifestyle. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Diabetes NSW & ACT
National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (n.p.). Insulin Resistance. Retrieved 12 December, 2016, from http://daa.asn.au/for-the-public/smart-eating-for-you/nutrition-a-z/insulin-resistance/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes

WHAT IS TYPE 1 DIABETES?

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, caused by the immune system attacking the pancreas and destroying the insulin making cells. As a result, the body cannot use the glucose as energy, which significantly increases the blood glucose levels in the body.

Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but commonly occurs in childhood and adolescence. Some common symptoms include excessive thirst, dehydration, weight loss, passing more urine, blurred vision, and fatigue. There is no known cause or cure for Type 1 diabetes. However, if not diagnosed properly or poorly managed complications can occur.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your Type 1 diabetes. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood glucose levels, diet history, and insulin medications. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Type 1 Diabetes – Diabetes Australia
Type 1 - National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) 

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diabetes: Type 2 Diabetes

WHAT IS TYPE 2 DIABETES?

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin and/or the body’s cells (muscles and liver) do not respond properly to the hormone insulin (insulin resistance). As a result, there is a significant increase in blood glucose levels in the body.

Some risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes include being overweight, family history of diabetes, inactive lifestyle, age, women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), and certain ethnic groups (such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders). Symptoms may not be noticed, but common symptoms include excessive thirst, passing more urine, blurred vision, headaches, and always feeling hungry. Type 2 diabetes should be managed properly to reduce any complications from occurring.

Type 2 Diabetes is diagnosed by taking a blood glucose test, an Oral Glucose-Tolerance Test (OGTT), or a haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) test.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your Type 2 diabetes. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood glucose levels, diet history, and any diabetic medications. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Type 2 Diabetes – Diabetes Australia
Type 2 – National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diabetes: Gestational Diabetes

WHAT IS Gestational DIABETES?

During pregnancy, some women may be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs when the body does not respond properly to the hormone insulin (insulin resistance). This is due to hormones made by the placenta for the growth and development of the baby affecting the blood glucose levels in the body.

Women who are at a higher risk of developing gestational diabetes include being overweight, age of 30 years or above, family history of type 2 diabetes, previous history of gestational diabetes, and certain ethnic groups (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, Indian, Chinese, Vietnamese, Middle Eastern, and Polynesian).

Symptoms may not be noticed, but common symptoms include excessive thirst, passing more urine, tiredness, and thrush. Gestational diabetes should be managed properly to reduce any complications from occurring during and after pregnancy for you and your baby.

Gestational Diabetes is diagnosed by taking a Pregnancy Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (POGTT).

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your gestational diabetes, manage your pregnancy weight gain, and promote proper growth and development for your baby. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood glucose levels, diet history, weight, and any diabetic medications. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Gestational Diabetes – Diabetes Australia
Gestational Diabetes – National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Diverticular Disease (Diverticulosis & Diverticulitis)

WHAT IS DIVERTICULAR DISEASE?

Diverticular disease or diverticulosis occurs when small pockets appear on the sides of the large intestines (usually the colon). The small pockets are known as diverticula, and when they become inflamed or infected the condition is known as diverticulitis. 

Diverticular disease is most commonly found in older adults. There are generally no symptoms for diverticular disease, however symptoms are experienced with diverticulitis. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, constipation and/or diarrhoea, vomiting, fever, bloody stool, and bloating.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your diverticular disease. Diet requirements vary when you experience diverticulitis symptoms or not, therefore a multi-phase approach to diet progression will be undertaken. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Diverticular Disease – Bowel Cancer Australia

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (n.p.). Diverticulitis. Retrieved 15 December, 2016, from http://daa.asn.au/for-the-public/smart-eating-for-you/nutrition-a-z/diverticulitis/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Food Allergy

WHAT ARE FOOD ALLERGIES?

A food allergy occurs when the immune system has an adverse reaction to a protein in specific foods. The most common food allergies include eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, soy, milk, wheat, fish, and shellfish.

Allergic reactions to a food usually occur immediately and symptoms can range from mild to severe. Mild to moderate symptoms include swelling of the face, lips and/or eyes, hives and rashes, abdominal pain, and vomiting. Severe allergic reactions are called anaphylaxis and can be life threatening. Signs of anaphylaxis include difficulty breathing, swelling of the tongue and throat, persistent dizziness, irritated and red eyes, and loss of consciousness.

A food allergy is diagnosed by taking skin prick allergy tests or allergy blood tests.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help eliminate the specific food that is causing an allergic reaction in your diet. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia
Food Allergy – Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology & Allergy

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). What’s the difference between food allergy and food intolerance?. Retrieved 17 January, 2017, from What’s the difference between food allergy and food intolerance?
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.


Food Intolerance

WHAT ARE FOOD INTOLERANCES?

A food intolerance is a chemical reaction that occurs when a person has a reaction to chemicals that are found naturally in foods or by chemicals that are added to foods, and does not involve the immune system. Common natural chemicals that may cause a reaction include salicylates (found in a wide variety of herbs, spices, fruit and vegetables), amines (found in pineapple, bananas, vegetables, red wine, chocolate, citrus fruits, and mature cheeses), and glutamates (found in tomatoes, soy sauce, mushroom, and some cheeses). Common food additives that may cause a reaction include preservatives, artificial colours, and flavour enhancers such as monosodium glutamate (MSG).

Food intolerance reactions usually occur depending on the amount of food the person has eaten. A reaction occurs depending on the amount of chemicals in the person’s body, also known as the dose threshold. Therefore, different people may tolerate different amounts of the chemicals in their body. Common symptoms include headaches and migraines, diarrhoea, sweating, rashes, and breathing problems.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help identify the specific food/s in your diet that are causing an intolerance and help minimise symptoms. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Food Intolerance – Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology & Allergy

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). Understanding food intolerance & sensitivity. Retrieved 17 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/medical/understanding-food-intolerance-sensitivity/
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). What’s the difference between food allergy and food intolerance?. Retrieved 17 January, 2017, from What’s the difference between food allergy and food intolerance?
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


General Healthy Eating

Healthy eating is about what is best for your body, overall general health and wellbeing. Each person is an individual and will have different food requirements. It is about balance, moderation, variety, adequacy, and knowing what food is right for your body. Eating healthy will help reduce your risk or prevent nutritional issues such as heart disease, overweight and obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and Type 2 diabetes.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to improve your overall health. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Australian Guide to Healthy Eating

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


Gout

WHAT IS GOUT?

Gout is a common type of inflammatory arthritis. It occurs when there is a build up of uric acid in the blood, which causes crystals to form in the joints. This causes the joints to inflame, and the joint can become swollen, red, and very tender.

Gout is most commonly found in men, other risk factors include overweight and obesity, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, not drinking enough water, and a high alcohol consumption. The most common affected joint is in the big toe, but other areas that are affected by gout include feet, ankles, elbow, and knees. Common symptoms include sudden pain, swelling of the joint, warmth and tenderness. Also the skin around the joint will be tight, red, and shiny.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help manage and prevent gout attacks, identify specific foods in your diet that are causing an increase in uric acid in the blood, help minimise symptoms and reduce pain. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Gout – Arthritis Foundation

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). Helping to ease the pain of gout through diet. Retrieved 17 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/medical/helping-to-ease-the-pain-of-gout-through-diet/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2016). Gout: Background. Retrieved 18 January, 2017, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=1956&trid=19772&trcatid=38
PEN. (2016). Gout: Practice Guidance Toolkit. Retrieved 18 January, 2017, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=1956&tkid=20327


Heart Disease
(Coronary Heart Disease – CHD & Cardiovascular Disease - CVD)

WHAT IS HEART DISEASE?

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the general term used to describe all the diseases in relation to the heart and blood vessels. Heart disease or coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common form of cardiovascular disease. Heart disease occurs when the blood supplied to the heart is partially or completely blocked. This is caused by a build up of cholesterol and plaque in the walls of the arteries. If the arteries become completely blocked, a heart attack can occur.

Some risk factors for developing heart disease include increasing age, male gender, family history of heart disease, being overweight or obese, diabetes, smoking, inactive lifestyle, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help manage and reduce your risk of heart disease. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Heart Foundation
Heart Disease – Diabetes Australia

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2014). Cardiovascular Disease: Background. Retrieved 18 January, 2017, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=2671&trid=15643&trcatid=38


High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

WHAT IS HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE?

Blood pressure refers to the pressure of the blood in the arteries, which involves the heart pumping the blood around the body. High blood pressure or hypertension occurs when the arteries becoming less flexible, which causes a build of pressure in the body. As a result, blood pressure is elevated above normal.

Some risk factors for developing high blood pressure include age, family history of high blood pressure, being overweight or obese, smoking, inactive lifestyle, and a high alcohol consumption. Poor management of high blood pressure increases your risk of developing heart disease and stroke.

High blood pressure is diagnosed by your doctor by checking your blood pressure.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help manage your blood pressure. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood pressure results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Blood Pressure – Diabetes Australia
Blood Pressure – Heart Foundation

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). How can what I eat improve high blood pressure?. Retrieved 18 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/medical/how-can-what-i-eat-to-improve-high-blood-pressure/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2015). Cardiovascular Disease - Hypertension: Background. Retrieved 18 January, 2017, from https://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=674&trid=15159&trcatid=38
PEN. (2015). Cardiovascular Disease - Hypertension: Practice Guidance Toolkit. Retrieved 18 January, 2017, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=674&tkid=20096


High Cholesterol
(Hypercholesterolemia)

WHAT IS HIGH CHOLESTEROL?

Cholesterol is a type of fat found in the blood. There are two types of cholesterol, Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL) and High Density Lipoproteins (HDL). Low Density Lipoproteins is the unhealthy type of cholesterol, as too much of this type can block the arteries. High Density Lipoproteins are the healthy type of cholesterol, as it helps protect the arteries from being blocked and reduces your risk of heart disease. High cholesterol or hypercholesterolemia occurs when there is a build up of cholesterol and plaque in the walls of the arteries. If the arteries become completely blocked, a heart attack can occur.

Some risk factors for developing high cholesterol include having a family history of high cholesterol, being overweight or obese, and a high consumption of food high in saturated fats. Poor management of high cholesterol increases your risk of developing heart disease.

High cholesterol is diagnosed by taking a blood test (both HDL and LDL levels) by your doctor.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help manage your cholesterol levels. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Blood Cholesterol – Heart Foundation

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). How can what I eat improve high blood pressure?. Retrieved 19 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/medical/the-ins-and-outs-of-cholesterol/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
Crohn's Disease

WHAT IS CROHN's DISEASE?

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and occurs when the walls of the digestive system become inflamed. Inflammation can occur anywhere, ranging from the mouth, stomach, bowel, and anus, however, the small bowel or the first part of the large bowel are the most commonly affected areas.

A person may not experience any symptoms when the disease is inactive, however when the disease is active also known as a flare up, the severity and longevity of the symptoms will vary between each person, and can range from mild to severe. Common symptoms include diarrhoea, pain in the abdomen, weight loss, constipation, and fatigue.               

Crohn’s disease is diagnosed by taking a range of tests including blood tests, faecal (bowel motion) examination, x-rays, colonoscopy and gastroscopy, computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your Crohn’s disease. Diet requirements vary when you experience flare ups or the disease is inactive, therefore a multi-phase approach to diet progression will be undertaken. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight, blood test results, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Inflammatory Bowel Disease – Bowel Cancer Australia

REFERENCES

Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


Ulcerative Colitis (Colitis)

WHAT IS ULCERATIVE COLITIS?

Ulcerative colitis or colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and occurs when the inner lining of the large intestines become inflamed. Inflammation can occur anywhere in the large bowel, from the colon to the rectum, however, the colon is the most commonly affected area. Ulcers may form when inflammation is severe.

A person may not experience any symptoms when the disease is inactive, however when the disease is active also known as a flare up, the severity and longevity of the symptoms will vary between each person, and can range from mild to severe. Common symptoms include diarrhoea (sometimes with blood or mucus), pain in the abdomen, weight loss, and frequently going to the toilet.      

Ulcerative colitis is diagnosed by taking a range of tests including blood tests, faecal (bowel motion) examination, x-rays, colonoscopy and gastroscopy, computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your ulcerative colitis. Diet requirements vary when you experience flare ups or the disease is inactive, therefore a multi-phase approach to diet progression will be undertaken. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight, blood test results, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Inflammatory Bowel Disease – Bowel Cancer Australia

REFERENCES

Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

WHAT IS IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME?

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a long-term condition that affects the functioning of the bowel, where the bowel becomes sensitive and causes bloating and pain. Irritable bowel syndrome is a common condition, but is usually more commonly found in women.

The condition may occur at any age, but symptoms usually occur before the age of 40 years. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, passing of wind, recurring episodes of constipation and diarrhoea, bloating, nausea, and mucus in the stools.

Symptoms are similar to those of other gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, lactose intolerance, or coeliac disease. Therefore, proper diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome should be consulted with your doctor.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your irritable bowel syndrome, identify specific foods in your diet that are causing discomfort, help minimise symptoms and reduce pain. Diet requirements vary depending on the severity of the condition, therefore a multi-phase approach to diet progression will be undertaken. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight, blood test results, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Bowel Conditions – The Gut Foundation
Irritable Bowel Syndrome – Jean Hailes

REFERENCES

Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). A guide to irritable bowel syndrome. Retrieved 19 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/medical/a-guide-to-irritable-bowel-syndrome/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2015). Gastrointestinal System – Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Background. Retrieved 19 January, 2017, from https://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=3382&trid=19021&trcatid=38


Liver Disease

WHAT IS LIVER DISEASE?

Liver disease is a general term used to describe any health condition that causes the liver to not function properly. The common types of liver disease include fatty liver, non-alcoholic fatty liver, cirrhosis, hepatitis (A, B and C), haemochromatosis, liver cancer, autoimmune liver disorders, galactosemia, and Wilson’s disease.

Risk factors for liver disease include being obese, excessive alcohol consumption, having a family history of liver disease, inherited abnormalities of the liver, long term use of certain medications and drugs (such as herbal medicines), and hepatitis virus infections. Common symptoms include dark urine, fever, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, fatigue, abdominal pain, and yellow discolouration of the skin (jaundice). However, if poorly managed complications can occur, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, ascites (fluid retention in the abdomen, feet, legs, and back), and liver failure.

To diagnose liver disease as series of tests must be undertaken, such as physical examination, blood tests, ultrasounds (abdomen), computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and biopsy.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your liver disease. Diet requirements vary depending on the type of liver disease and the severity of the condition. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood test results, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Liver – Gastroenterological Society of Australia
The Australian Liver Foundation

REFERENCES

Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2008). Hepatic Disorders: Background. Retrieved 24 January, 2017, from https://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=2153&trid=2151&trcatid=38


Nutritional Deficiency

WHAT IS NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY?

Nutritional deficiency occurs when there is an insufficient amount of one or more nutrients (vitamins and minerals) in the body. Each person is an individual and will have different nutrient requirements. It is about balance, moderation, variety, adequacy, and knowing what food is right for your body.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to ensure you are meeting your dietary requirements and improve your overall health. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Five Food Groups – National Health & Medical Research Council

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning. 
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


Nutrition Support
(Cancer, Malnutrition) 

Nutrition support is required when a person is not meeting their nutritional requirements and extra assistance is required to ensure their nutritional requirements are met. Nutrition support can be given orally, through a feeding tube, or intravenously through the veins if the digestive system is not able to be used or the person is unable to eat. Some health conditions that may need nutrition support include cancer (oncology), malnutrition, and renal disease (chronic kidney disease).

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to ensure you are meeting your nutritional requirements. Diet requirements vary depending on the severity of the condition, therefore a multi-phase approach to diet progression will be undertaken. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

REFERENCES

Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


Osteopenia

WHAT IS OSTEOPENIA?

Osteopenia occurs when the bone mineral density is lower than normal, but is not low enough to be classified as osteoporosis. Low bone mineral density causes the bones to be weaker than normal.

Osteopenia is most commonly found in the elderly and post menopausal women. Other risk factors include having a family history of osteoporosis, low calcium and vitamin D levels, early menopause, smoking, inactive lifestyle, age, excessive alcohol consumption, long term use of medications such as corticosteroids for rheumatoid arthritis and asthma, and extreme dieting. There are usually no symptoms that occur with osteopenia. Having osteopenia puts you at a high risk for getting osteoporosis.

Osteopenia is diagnosed by taking a bone density scan.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to improve your calcium and vitamin D levels. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Osteoporosis Australia

REFERENCES

Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders


Osteoporosis

WHAT IS OSTEOPOROSIS?

Osteoporosis occurs when bones loses minerals, such as calcium and as a result causing the bones to become thin, weak, fragile, and brittle. As a result, bones can be easily fractured even from a minor bump. Common areas on the body that can be easily fractured are the hip, spine and wrist.

Osteoporosis is most commonly found in women. Other risk factors include having a family history of osteoporosis, low calcium and vitamin D levels, early menopause, smoking, inactive lifestyle, age, excessive alcohol consumption, long term use of medications such as corticosteroids for rheumatoid arthritis and asthma, and extreme dieting. There are usually no symptoms that occur with osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is diagnosed by taking a bone density scan or a DXA scan.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to improve your calcium and vitamin D levels. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Osteoporosis Australia

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2014). Osteoporosis: Practice Guidance Toolkit. Retrieved 20 January, 2017, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=553&tkid=21818


Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

WHAT IS POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME?

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex hormonal condition. It is a condition where there is a hormonal balance, preventing the ovaries releasing an egg each month. This results in tiny cyst like follicles forming on the ovaries, which can affect fertility.

Polycystic ovary syndrome is a common condition amongst women of reproductive age, affecting around 12-18%. Additionally, groups at higher risk include certain ethnic groups, such as Aboriginal women, and having a family history of polycystic ovary syndrome. Common symptoms for polycystic ovary syndrome include weight gain, reduced fertility, irregular menstrual cycle, amenorrhoea (no periods), acne, excessive body and facial hair, obesity, and mood changes (such as anxiety and depression).

The condition is associated with long-term health risks such as insulin resistance, increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol, cancer, and cardiovascular disease (heart disease, stroke, and heart attack).

To diagnose polycystic ovary syndrome a series of tests must be undertaken, including medical history, examination, blood tests and ultrasounds.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your polycystic ovary syndrome. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood test results, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome – Jean Hailes

REFERENCES

Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2015). Endocrine/Metabolic – Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Background. Retrieved 20 January, 2017, from https://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=11702&trid=11763&trcatid=38


Pregnancy 

During pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, and after pregnancy (breastfeeding) there is an increase in nutritional requirements for you and your baby, such as folate, iron, and calcium. Good nutrition is important to help keep you and your baby healthy. Each person is an individual and will have different nutrient requirements. It is about balance, moderation, variety, adequacy, and knowing what food is right for you and your baby.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed for each stage of the pregnancy and help you manage your nutritional requirements, manage your pregnancy weight gain, help reduce symptoms (such as nausea, heartburn and constipation), and promote proper growth and development for your baby. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood test results, weight, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Healthy Eating When You Are Pregnant Or Breastfeeding – National Health & Medical Research Council
Healthy Pregnancy – Pregnancy, Birth & Baby

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). Nutrition for pregnancy. Retrieved 23 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/pregnancy/nutrition-for-pregnancy/
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). What do I need to eat if I’m breastfeeding?. Retrieved 23 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/pregnancy/what-extra-things-do-i-need-to-eat-if-im-breastfeeding/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2016). Pregnancy: Guidance Toolkit. Retrieved 23 January, 2017, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=3043&tkid=22118


Reflux
(Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease – Gord/Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease - Gerd)

WHAT IS REFLUX?

Reflux or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) occurs when gastric acids in the stomach leaks and moves into the oesphagus (food pipe). A person will experience reflux once after they have eaten a meal.

Some risk factors for reflux include being overweight, stress, excessive alcohol consumption, overeating, high consumption of food that are high in fat, food allergy, caffeine, pregnancy, and hiatus hernia. Common symptoms of reflux include heartburn, chest pain, nausea acid taste, burping, and regurgitation. If left untreated there is an increased risk of developing long-term health problems and can affect a person’s quality of life.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your reflux, identify specific foods in your diet that are causing discomfort, help minimise symptoms and reduce pain. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

What are Heartburn & Reflux? – NPS MedicineWise


REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2016). Gastrointestinal System – Gastroesophageal/Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD/GORD): Background. Retrieved 23 January, 2017, from https://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=1707&trid=1695&trcatid=38


Renal Disease (Chronic Kidney Disease – CKD)

WHAT IS RENAL DISEASE?

Renal disease or chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when there is damage to the kidneys and it does not filter the blood effectively, as a result your kidneys do not function properly. There are are five stages of renal disease, and each stage is related to the level of the kidney function and kidney damage. A guide to each of the stages is as follows, Stages I and II normal to mild kidney damage, Stage III moderate kidney damage, Stage IV severe kidney damage, and Stage V kidney failure.

Some risk factors for renal disease include high blood pressure, diabetes, being obese, having a family history of kidney failure, smoking, aged of 60 years, heart problems or stroke, history of acute kidney injury, and certain ethnic groups (such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders). Common symptoms include a change in the frequency and quantity of urine passed, blood in the urine, back pain, burning sensations when passing urine, puffy eyes and ankles (odoema), loss of appetite, and high blood pressure. However, if not diagnosed properly or poorly managed complications can occur, such as renal failure.

To diagnose renal disease a series of tests must be undertaken, including urine tests, blood tests, imaging and scans, and biopsies.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to ensure you are managing your renal disease. Diet requirements vary depending on the stage of your renal disease, therefore a multi-phase approach to diet progression will be undertaken. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood test results, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Kidney Disease – Kidney Health Australia

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders 
PEN. (2016). Chronic Kidney Disease: Background. Retrieved 23 January, 2017, from https://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=8158&trid=25221&trcatid=38


Vegetarian Diet
(Vegan, Lacto and Ovo-Lacto)

WHAT IS A VEGETARIAN DIET?

A vegetarian diet is the general term used to describe diets that are based around plants foods, and exclude meat, poultry, seafood or other animal-derived foods. The three common vegetarian diets are vegan, lacto vegetarian, and ovo-lacto vegetarian. A vegan diet is a diet based only on plant foods, excluding all types of meats and animal-derived products. A lacto vegetarian diet is a diet that includes dairy and plant foods. A ovo-lacto vegetarian diet is a diet that includes eggs, dairy and plant foods.

There are many health benefits associated with a vegetarian diet, however if not managed properly some key nutrients may be lacking in the diet (nutritional deficiency), including protein, iron, zinc, vitamin B12, calcium, and omega-3. Each person is an individual and will have different nutrient requirements. It is about balance, moderation, variety, adequacy, and knowing what food is right for your body.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to ensure you are meeting your dietary requirements and improve your overall health. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood test results and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Australian Vegetarian Society
Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). Vegetarian diets – the basics. Retrieved 24 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/healthy-eating/vegetarian-diets-the-basics/
Dietitians Association of Australia. (2017). Vegan diets: everything you need to know. Retrieved 24 January, 2017, from https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/healthy-eating/vegan-diets-facts-tips-and-considerations/
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2012). Vegetarianism: Background. Retrieved 24 January, 2017, from http://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=2709&trid=19086&trcatid=38


Weight Management (Overweight and Obesity)

When food is consumed it is converted into energy in the body, and when there is an imbalance in energy, you are eating more than what is required for your body, this can result in weight gain. Weight gain occurs due to the excessive energy being stored as fat. Excessive weight gain can lead to overweight and obesity. If your weight is not managed properly you are at a higher risk of developing nutritional issues such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you lose weight, manage your weight, reduce your risk or prevent the development of nutritional issues, and improve your overall health and wellbeing. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your weight and body measurements, blood test results, and diet history. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Tips for Losing Weight Healthy – National Health & Medical Research Council

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning. 
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders
PEN. (2016). Healthy Weight/Obesity: Background. Retrieved 24 January, 2017, from https://www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=803&trid=19748&trcatid=38