Diabetes: Type 2 Diabetes

WHAT IS TYPE 2 DIABETES?

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin and/or the body’s cells (muscles and liver) do not respond properly to the hormone insulin (insulin resistance). As a result, there is a significant increase in blood glucose levels in the body.

Some risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes include being overweight, family history of diabetes, inactive lifestyle, age, women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), and certain ethnic groups (such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders). Symptoms may not be noticed, but common symptoms include excessive thirst, passing more urine, blurred vision, headaches, and always feeling hungry. Type 2 diabetes should be managed properly to reduce any complications from occurring.

Type 2 Diabetes is diagnosed by taking a blood glucose test, an Oral Glucose-Tolerance Test (OGTT), or a haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) test.

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU

Nutritional strategies will be developed to help you manage your Type 2 diabetes. During the assessment, an in depth analysis will be conducted, with a focus on your blood glucose levels, diet history, and any diabetic medications. An individualised plan will be developed, taking into account your lifestyle, culture and eating habits to ensure achievable goals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Type 2 Diabetes – Diabetes Australia
Type 2 – National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)

REFERENCES

Crowe, T., Smith, D., Walsh, A., Whitney, E. & Rolfes, S. (2014). Understanding nutrition: Australian and New Zealand. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.
Mahan, L., Stump, S., Raymond, J. & Krause, M. (2012). Krause's food & the nutrition care process. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Saunders.